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Starting today, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will begin enforcing the provisions of the Uighur Forced Labor Prevention Act to ban the import of products made in Xinjiang to the United States by forced labor. President Biden signed the law on December 23, 2021, after it was passed with overwhelming bipartisan support in the United States Congress, underscoring our commitment to the fight against forced labor everywhere, including Xinjiang, where genocide and crimes against humanity are ongoing.

The State Department is committed to working with Congress and our inter-agency partners to continue the fight against forced labor in Xinjiang and to strengthen international coordination against this unprecedented human rights violation. Addressing forced labor and other human rights violations in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and around the world is a priority for President Biden and this administration. We have taken concrete steps to promote accountability in Xinjiang, including visa restrictions, financial sanctions against Global Magnitsky, export controls, suspension orders and import restrictions, and publishing business advice to several Xinjiang agencies to help U.S. companies avoid trade that facilitates or benefits from human rights violations, including forced labor. Together with our inter-agency partners, we will continue to engage companies to remind them of U.S. legal obligations prohibiting the importation into the United States of goods made with forced labor.

We bring together our allies and partners to make global supply chains free from the use of forced labor, to speak out against the crimes in Xinjiang, and to join us in calling on the PRC government to immediately end crimes and human rights violations, including forced labor.

For more information on implementing the Act, see: https://www.dhs.gov/uflpa.

Why is China against Uyghurs?

Uighurs have no religious rights, and Islamic leaders during the Cultural Revolution were forced to take part in acts against their religion, such as eating pork. China is not enforcing the law against children attending mosques on non-Uighurs outside Xinjiang.

What is China doing to the Uighurs? Since 2016, the Chinese government has targeted the Uighur people with a broad surveillance system, intensive police, mass detentions and forced labor systems. Researchers estimate that more than a million Uighurs have been detained in a series of captured camps across the region.

When did China oppress Uyghurs?

When did China start suffocating Xinjiang? Muslim Uighurs have faced bans on their religious and cultural customs since the founding of the Chinese Communist Party in 1949. In light of this oppression, Uighurs began migrating from the region as early as the 1960s.

Why is China detaining the Uyghurs?

Local authorities reportedly keep hundreds of thousands of Uighurs in these camps, as well as members of other ethnic minority groups in China, for the stated purpose of countering extremism and terrorism and promoting social integration.

Does Uniqlo use Uyghur cotton?

No UNIQLO products are produced in the Xinjiang region. ” The company also said no Uniqlo manufacturing partners are subcontracting to fabric factories or spinning mills in the region.

Which brands use Uighur cotton? These brands are still associated with Uighur forced labor. Help them stop now.

  • Fila. LL Bean. …
  • Brioni. Levi’s. …
  • Almost all the world’s clothing brands are also involved in the use of cotton originating from East Turkestan (Xinjiang) occupied by the Chinese. …
  • This cotton is then exported worldwide.

Does UNIQLO use Xinjiang cotton?

A Uniqlo statement said the company was “committed to protecting the human rights of people in our supply chains” and that none of its manufacturing, fabric or spinning partners are located in Xinjiang.

Where does UNIQLO source cotton?

UNIQLO produces sustainable cotton * 1, which includes cotton originating in China. By definition, sustainable cotton is one that ensures human rights and a good working environment, in line with international standards. Sustainable cotton prohibits the use of both forced labor and child labor on farms.

Which country works least?

The Netherlands ranks first on the list of countries with the lowest working hours per week. Low unemployment and high incomes are key characteristics of the working community in the Netherlands.

Which country has the lowest working week? According to the OECD, the country with the shortest working week is the Netherlands, with 29.5 working hours per week reported. Observed by days, that means a four-day working week with only 7.37 hours.

What is the least hard working country?

From the data for 2019 reviewed in this article, South Africa was surprisingly the lowest with a happiness index of 4.72, probably due to congestion and lack of free time. Mexico scored 6.6, Costa Rica 7.17, Korea 5.9 and Russia 5.65.

Which country have less working hours?

Workers in rich European countries, the Netherlands, Sweden, Austria and Iceland, also work less than 1,500 hours a year on average, over 200 hours (approximately 5.5 weeks) less than the OECD average.

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