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Last summer, California suffered the most in its history. Drought and scorching heat caused more fires than ever before. Two of the largest fires in the country’s history have engulfed more than a million hectares in Northern California, burning accidentally near Lake Tahoe. Firefighters did not have a day off for months. Firefighters have warned that there are not enough planes around. “It’s a war,” someone told us. So firefighters from Southern California stole a page from the military: taking over the night. As we began to report last fall, a group of high-tech helicopters battled wildfires 24/7. And for the first time, the giant Chinook – you see them in some battlefields – led the night raid. It was an 18-million-dollar airline program – which fire officials hope will turn into a game.

U.S. Department The Forest Service was short-lived when the Caldor Fire erupted last August, en route to Lake Tahoe South. Thousands of residents were forced to flee. To the north, Dixie Fire erupted for months, tearing down ancient gold-run towns. Dry forests are so hot that they can produce their own volcanic eruptions. Between the two infernos, more than 8,000 exhausted firefighters fought a continuous battle. Orange County Fire Chief Brian Fennessy – a former Hotshot firefighter who has been fighting fires in Southern California for 44 years – has told us there will be no more administration.

Brian Fennessy: These fires are so great that there are not enough firefighters, not enough planes, helicopters, bulldozers.

Bill Whitaker: I think that would be disturbing.

Brian Fennessy: You know, we’ve got there if we can send more, we’ll have empty fireplaces. And for the people we have vowed to serve, you know, our taxpayers, it is not acceptable to have empty fireplaces for long.

Bill Whitaker: Everything is straight to the limit.

Brian Fennessy: It’s all straightforward.

We met Brian Fennessy at Truckee Airport, about 30 miles [45 km] from the fire. After Caldor destroyed the town of Grizzly Flats, Fennessy volunteered to ship his new northern fire choppers. Like flying computers with rotors on top, they are called Quick Reaction Force. Fennessy calls the ships, “The Hammer.”

Brian Fennessy: This is The Hammer!

Bill Whitaker: So if someone calls 911

Brian Fennessy: If something explodes

Bill Whitaker: You hit it with everything you have, these big guys and knock it out.

Brian Fennessy: In the event of a fire, break the glass.

The star of the program is the great Chinook – this used to fly to Afghanistan for the U.S. Army. It is designed to fight various battles, throw water or delay. Then, Fennessy told us that they have this powerful new device to take that fight at night.

Brian Fennessy: The ability to place a wireless, continuous fire after sunset, is a priority.

Bill Whitaker: Will that change the way you fight fires?

Brian Fennessy: We hope so.

Chinook can drop 3,000 liters. That is about 10 times more than most firefighters set up. No larger helicopter has ever fought a fire at night.

Wayne Coulson, CEO of Coulson Aviation – a shipbuilder – is a pioneer at night firefighting. He showed us a specially made tank. Computers control the tank doors, turning on precise GPS points.

Bill Whitaker: Can you get right where you want to go down?

Wayne Coulson: We can fly a plane to those GPS locations and the doors will open and close between the two points.

Coulson told us it was a surgical strike. Flame retardant can be thrown in almost straight lines. At night, there is an added benefit: fire often goes out.

Bill Whitaker: Is that a better time to hit fire?

Wayne Coulson: That’s right. That’s when it’s very weak.

Bill Whitaker: Usually very weak?

Wayne Coulson: It’s time to attack the enemy, with its limited time.

Quick Reaction Force works both. Chinook gets its instructions from this aircraft. Think of it as a traffic control tower – but in the air. Wearing night vision glasses, Orange County Air Attack officer Joel Lane uses infrared cameras to see in the smoke to map Chinook’s ideal target.

Lane has spent the last 23 years in the air. Improved night vision technology has restored firefighting at night – many organizations stopped flying at night after a windstorm in the 1970s. Our Lanetold technology means they can attack fires at any hour.

Joel Lane: If you set a fireletssay time for one minute, and 2 acres, in two minutes, it will not be 4, it will be 9. And after three minutes, will be 27.

Bill Whitaker: And the fire is moving fast.

Joel Lane: And the only thing that stops it is speed.

Bill Whitaker: And that’s what you get on the plane?

Joel Lane: That’s what you get on a plane.

In early September we flew with Britt Coulson, son of Wayne and wizard of technology Coulson Aviation. He turned on the powerful camera and the Caldor Fire exploded.

Britt Coulson: Those flames are higher than trees.

As we approached, we gazed at the fountain of burning coals on the tops of the trees. There was a fire everywhere, and each light was a new fire of hell.

Britt Coulson: The rays that appear when they are very strong, will see very early.

In Zoomingin, BrittCoulson showed us a fire that had been extinguished over a wire dug by firefighters.

Wayne Coulson: So let’s not say if they were trying to treat it the same way there.

Bill Whitaker: Is this a mistake?

Wayne Coulson: It’s over. Without this kind of technology, they will never see that.

We circled the fires with 13,000 feet. Below us, we saw a command helicopter with Joel Lane. A thousand meters below that is where Chinook flies. The lane leads to a large chopper in the drop area. From our vantage point, we could count the trees as we flew through a dark area. Then we saw ships, harbors and houses: South Lake Tahoe.

Wayne Coulson: It is a South Lake Tahoe airport right there. And then you get a fire right there.

Bill Whitaker: Behind it.

Wayne Coulson: So, you have all the embers coming.

Bill Whitaker: That’s very hot.

Chinook drains the flames, drops its water, and heads for a nearby lake to refill. Unlike a fixed-wing vessel that must return to the base, Chinook can fill anywhere. It flies like any other prehistoric bird, absorbing 3,000 gallons [3,000 L] in 90 seconds.

This is not cheap. A helicopter ship can cost $ 15 million, and $ 8,000 an hour to operate it. But Joel Lane told us it was money well spent.

He told us about the Tuna Fire, which was burned in a dry brush near Malibu last July. It was immediately seized by Chinookat’s immediate response at a cost of several thousand dollars, a fraction of what it would have cost if the fire had gone out of control. If you have never heard of Tuna Fire, say Lane, it is a victory.

Joel Lane: So the 10 hectare fire that we hold 98% of the time, will never make paper, you will never hear about it. The community wakes up the next day and unless they drive it, they never know it happened. And we are doing that very effectively, especially in Southern California.

Bill Whitaker: The money you put in, that, yes, costs a lot to own these planes but it costs a lot of money when you don’t.

Bill Whitaker: Is it too expensive?

In northern California, DixieFire became one of the largest fires in the country’s history. Firefighters fought the Caldor Fire for months. Thekost? More than half a billion dollars and climbing. However, during our trip in August last year, helicopters flew only one night out of four. We wondered, why? So did Orange County Fire Chief Brian Fennessy, who provided the best equipment to fight the country’s worst fires.

Bill Whitaker: Didn’t they use it once you brought it here?

Brian Fennessy: Not at the beginning, no.

Brian Fennessy: It took a long time- they didn’t have any knowledge of flying at night. And so we had to slow down.

Brian Fennessy: And we’re in the middle of chaos and instability and houses are on fire, that doesn’t work.

The week we were there, Caldor Fire grew on 40,000 acres. Probably a bit alarming: we found out that the delay was triggered, in part, by the war between the U.S. Forest Service, in charge of federal states, and Cal Fire, responsible for national forests. Chief Fennessy told us he had twice given up his new ships, and twice encountered conflicts and confusion.

We’ve seen forest workers sign resolutions, but they change them with Cal Fire. Firefighters told us that the organizations were not in agreement overnight work, radio waves, and how to feed the firefighters. They both challenged the letters of the Orange County flight crew.

Bill Whitaker: Doesn’t that seem like the most effective way to handle equipment, especially in the face of a big fire?

Brian Fennessy: It’s very confusing. We have a system, the Fire Service, where we honor other letters. Yes, it is frustrating because you know there is a delay in receiving these letters to discredit the public, yes, that is the case.

When Chief Fennessy sent his choppers for the first time, two staff members stayed on the site for 48 hours. Tired, he protested by e-mail, which we received in a request for Freedom of Information .

He wrote: “I do not think the public will understand this madness.” Especially if our staff are down and there are no aviation safety issues that need to be addressed. “

Cal Firetold usthe crew check was a common safety measure and that smoke and air prevented some nights from flying. King Fennessy told us only when he threatened to return his choppers to the south, where the agencies provided green light to fly.

However, Brian Fennessy and two other Southern California firefighters, who were terrified of the ships being used for a while, complained in an e-mail to the Forest Service: “There was and adequate security of the [Quick Reaction Force] in both day and night, but this did not happen.

Brian Fennessy: I expect that when I lend you, you know, my stuff because you have an emergency, you will work it out. If you can’t use it, send it home, because I have a job, and I have residents to protect. We will go to work.

Fennessy told us the power of these fires requires a new way to combat them.

Brian Fennessy: I had heard from high-level organizations, that there was no issue of air safety. It was an even more troubling issue for–

Brian Fennessy: You said it.

Bill Whitaker: The fire is changing …

Brian Fennessy: Fires are changing. We must pass –

Bill Whitaker: The climate is changing

Brian Fennessy: Oh — we have to be a much easier person. We must be able to click very quickly –

Bill Whitaker: Fire can’t wait for you to meet.

Brian Fennessy: No, they are not.

We repeatedly asked Cal Fire and the Forest Service why nightclubs were not used more. Weeks later, they met to deliver a joint statement on their “shared mission.”

They wrote: “Each fire produces its own unique problems and firefighters stand on their shoulders every day to overcome these obstacles …”

The day after we left, Chief Fennessy took his Quick Reaction Army back south to where the Santa Ana winds and the number of fires were rising. Fennessy told us, as the fire gets worse, Cal Fire and Forest Service will not be able to set aside the Big Hammer.

Brian Fennessy: These planes are credited with stockpiling because they were available at night to do so.

Bill Whitaker: And you proved it.

Brian Fennessy: We proved it. It is a program that I believe needs to be expanded not only to Northern California, but across the West.

Bill Whitaker: What is the opposition? Why did they protest?

Brian Fennessy: You know, my gut tells me based on decades of experience in the Fire Service that there is a natural resistance to change. But we must change. We have to do a pivot. We are standing, you know, in the new world. It is not a new tradition. It’s normal.

The Quick Reaction Force is funded for the second fire season, July through December.

Produced by Heather Abbott. Vice Producer: LaCrai Mitchell. Assistant broadcaster: Emilio Almonte. Edited by Warren Lustig.

Which state has the most wildfires 2021?

California is the most common wildfire country in the United States. By 2021, more than 9,000 wildfires have burned in the Southwest province, affecting some 2.23 million hectares. California has accounted for 31 percent of all hectares burned as a result of wildfires in the U.S.

How many wildfires have occurred in 2021? By 2021, 8,619 wildfires have burned nearly 2.6 million hectares. There have been three killings and 3,629 buildings damaged or destroyed. On the same subject : What happens if Californians pass two sports betting initiatives?. All but three of the top 20 fires in California have occurred since 2000. Most of these major fires in California have occurred in the past two years, three of which occurred in 2021.

What states are most at risk for wildfires?

In 30 years, the First Street model predicts that California will take the lead, with 631,755 addresses addressing at least 1 percent of the annual fire hazard, followed by Texas (property). 474,367) and Florida (383,634). Arizona, Utah, Nevada and New Mexico will have more than 100,000 dangerous goods.

What states are currently affected by wildfires? This may interest you : United States Solicitor General obtains Prop 12 Infringement Interstate Commerce Clause.

Current U.S. Heaters

  • New Mexico. 81 mello. 884,496 hectares.
  • Texas. 154 fire. 447,992 hectares.
  • Alaska. 49 fire. 306,842 hectares.
  • Arizona. 68 mello. 95,348 acres.
  • Oklahoma. 29 mello. 73,449 acres.
  • Nebraska. 7 moto. 46,206 hectares.
  • Colorado. 49 fire. 30,456 hectares.
  • Kansas. 8 mello. 24,860 acres.

Which state has the highest wildfire potential?

â € œIn most of the United States, there is a chance of a fire.â € Perhaps surprisingly, the country with the most assets is facing at least 1 percent of the fire risk. wild is Florida, with about 200,000 such packages. (The next highest is Texas and California, with approximately 100,000 properties each.)

What states are currently affected by wildfires?

Current U.S. Heaters

  • New Mexico. 81 mello. 884,496 hectares.
  • Texas. 154 fire. 447,992 hectares.
  • Alaska. 49 fire. 306,842 hectares.
  • Arizona. 68 mello. 95,348 acres.
  • Oklahoma. 29 mello. 73,449 acres.
  • Nebraska. 7 moto. 46,206 hectares.
  • Colorado. 49 fire. 30,456 hectares.
  • Kansas. 8 mello. 24,860 acres.

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StructureNumber of fires
California9,280
Texas5,576
North Carolina5,151
Montana2,573

Where are wildfires mostly happening?

Most wildfires occur in the East (including the Middle East), but wildfires in the West are larger and burn more acreages (including Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico , Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming).

Which state has the most wildfires right now?

California is the most common wildfire country in the United States.

What state has the most wildfires in 2021?

There were more than 9,000 wildfires in California by 2021, making the United States the highest number of wildfires that year. Fires that year were the worst in California, when 2.23 million hectares were burned as a result of wildfires – about 31 percent of the total land lost in the country.

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How much damage did the California wildfires cause 2020?

3, 2020, there were 9,279 California fire incidents on 4,197,628 hectares burned. There were 10,488 damaged or damaged buildings and at least 31 people were killed. The 4.2 million hectares burned in 2020 are the largest in a single year since CalFire began keeping records, and over the past three years have been consolidated.

How much damage did California fires do in 2020? Fires have killed 33 people by 2020 with a total economic loss of more than $ 19 billion and the cost of firefighting is approaching $ 2.1 billion. The years 2020 and 2021 together burned more areas than the previous seven years combined, and it was slightly lower than the number burned between 1980 and 1999.

How long have the California wildfires been burning 2020?

In the new world of massive fires, a series of fires erupted in late August with lightning bolts and a fire that lasted for four months. The 4.2 million hectares burned last year is equivalent to the total area of ​​Los Angeles, Orange, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties combined.

How long has California had wildfires?

Get the latest news on climate change, as well as tips on how to help. Try the Climate Forward newspaper for 4 weeks. The California fire report began in 1932; The 10 largest fires since then have occurred since 2000, including the 2018 Mendocino Complex Fire, the largest in the country’s history, and last year’s L.N.U.

How long have the California wildfires been burning 2021?

2021 California wild dreams
(days)January 14 – December 16th
Buildings are damaged3,629
Disease3
Non-fatal injuries22

What caused the California forest fires 2020?

He is among a number of experts who claim that the combination of factors has led to massive, devastating fires in California: abnormal droughts and temperatures exacerbated by climate change, vegetation caused by fire suppression for decades, and rapid population growth on the edge of forests. .

How many wildfires are caused by humans in California?

Most wildfires are man-made (on average 89% from 2017 to 2021), although wildfires caused by lightning are relatively larger and burn more accreages (52% of the average burnt acreage from 2017 to 2021 lit by lightning).

Do humans cause most wildfires?

Studies have shown that arson is responsible for 84% of all fires occurring in the United States, with 97% of all family threats.

How much damage has been caused by the wildfires?

NOAA estimates the total cost of wildfires in 2017 and 2018 at more than $ 40 billion. By 2019, wildfires have caused an estimated $ 4.5 billion in California and Alaska.

How many fatalities were caused by the wildfires in 2020?

Thirty-one people lost their lives as a result of the California wildfire in 2020. Not the worst number ever, but this is the third year in a row. with the highest number of diseases since 2013. Only one fire, North Complex, killed 15 of those people.

How much have wildfires increased since 2000?

Since 2000, the annual average of 70,072 wildfires has burned an annual average of 7.0 million hectares. The acreage rate is more than double the annual average burned in the 1990s (3.3 million hectares), although the largest number of fires occurred each year in the 1990s (average 78,600).

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How many wildfires were there in 2020?

2020: 58,950 fires affecting 10,122,336 hectares. 2019: 50,477 fires affect 4,664,364 hectares. 2018: 58,083 fires affect 8,767,492 hectares.

What wildfires have occurred in 2020? The August 2020 lightning fires include three of the largest fires in California recorded history: SCU Lightning Complex, August Complex, and LNU Lightning Complex.

How many wildfires are in the World 2020?

January-DecemberOverall2001-2020 Summary
Acres Chesoa10,274,6797,000,514
Number of Fires58,25868,707
Acres Burned by Fire176.4103.9

How many wildfires occur each year in the world?

Since 2000, the annual average of 70,072 wildfires has burned an annual average of 7.0 million hectares.

Did 2020 have the most wildfires?

The year 2020 was the largest wildfire year reported in California history, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. From a historical point of view, the average number of acres burned before 1850 was probably larger than the years since reliable fire records began.

How many wildfires burned 2020?

Quick Summary. More than 9,900 wildfires have burned nearly 4.3 million hectares by 2020. That is more than double the first record of the hectares burned in California.

How many wildfires are burning in the United States?

In the United States 31, the National Interagency Fire Center’s (NIFC) reported a total of 58,733 wildfires nationwide that burned more than 7.13 million hectares. The average annual so far was 61,524 fires burning 7.47 million hectares.

Did 2020 have the most wildfires?

The year 2020 was the largest wildfire year reported in California history, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. From a historical point of view, the average number of acres burned before 1850 was probably larger than the years since reliable fire records began.

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What caused the 2020 California fires?

One of the best-known examples is the El Dorado Fire in 2020, where forest fires burned 13,715 hectares of land started as a result of a pyrotechnical smoke-emitting device that did not work at a sex-explicit ceremony. What Is Addition And Extension In California State Fires? Short answer: climate change.

How many homes were lost as a result of the California fire? Firefighters emerge in the highlands of Southern California: 20 homes damaged, 11 damaged. With the help of quiet air, the mandatory evacuation of 900 homes has dropped to 131.

How many homes have been lost in the California fires 2021?

By 2021, 8,619 wildfires have burned nearly 2.6 million hectares. There have been three killings and 3,629 buildings damaged or destroyed.

How many houses were destroyed in the wildfire?

According to Cal Fire, 1,259 buildings were destroyed, including 78 single-family homes. More than 13,000 buildings were in danger of collapsing.

How many houses burned down in 2021?

2021 California burning
Summary of location2,569,009 acres (1,039,641 ha)
CostsAnonymous
(days)January 14 – December 16th
Buildings are damaged3,629

How much land was burned in California 2020?

Overall In the year of high estimates, some statistics are special for the California fire year 2020: 4 million hectares, 112 million tons of greenhouse gases, hit thousands, liters 11 million fire retardants.

How many acres did the US burn in 2020?

2020: 58,950 fires affecting 10,122,336 hectares.

How much of California has been burned?

A survey conducted by Bay Area News Group found that since 2012, a total of 12.7 million hectares have been burned in California, which is also twice the 6.4 million hectares burned in the district over the past decade.

How did the California wildfires affect the economy 2021?

“Total damage and total economic losses for the 2021 wildfire season are expected to be between $ 70 billion and $ 90 billion in the U.S. by $ 45 billion to $ 55 billion of those costs in California alone,” he said. said Myers.

How do wildfires affect the economy? Large national fires create instability in the domestic labor market by increasing the difference in working hours over the next year. It is important to keep track of the expenditure in your area because it helps to coordinate the effects of the labor market.

How did the California wildfire affect the economy?

Although the cost of wildfires is not tracked, there are academic studies that try to estimate those costs and generate surprising numbers. For example, in 2020, a team of researchers studied the global impact of the California California fire season, and estimated that its economic cost was $ 148.5 billion.

How much money has California lost from wildfires?

According to its data, the seven worst wildfires, all in California, each cost billions of dollars in insurance losses. Camp Fire, 2018: Total costs from the most expensive US fire of all time are estimated at $ 10 billion, about $ 10.38 billion by 2020 value.

How did the California wildfires affect the economy 2021?

“Total damage and total economic losses for the 2021 wildfire season are expected to be between $ 70 billion and $ 90 billion in the U.S. by $ 45 billion to $ 55 billion of those costs in California alone,” he said. said Myers.

How much did the California wildfires cost 2021?

Two of the largest wildfires in California in 2021 cost firefighters more than $ 500 million in repression, with a third costing more than a quarter of a million dollars to fight, according to new federal data.

How much damage did the California wildfires cause 2021?

By the end of 2021 8,835 fires had been reported, burning 2,568,948 hectares (1,039,616 ha) across the country. About 3,629 buildings were damaged or destroyed by wildfires, and at least seven firefighters and two residents were injured.

How much did wildfires cost the US in 2021?

“Total damage and total economic losses for the 2021 wildfire season are expected to be between $ 70 billion and $ 90 billion in the U.S. by $ 45 billion to $ 55 billion of those costs in California alone,” he said. said Myers.

How much damage did the California wildfires cause 2021?

By the end of 2021 8,835 fires had been reported, burning 2,568,948 hectares (1,039,616 ha) across the country. About 3,629 buildings were damaged or destroyed by wildfires, and at least seven firefighters and two residents were injured.

How much did wildfires cost the US in 2021?

“Total damage and total economic losses for the 2021 wildfire season are expected to be between $ 70 billion and $ 90 billion in the U.S. by $ 45 billion to $ 55 billion of those costs in California alone,” he said. said Myers.

How much damage has the wildfires caused in California?

According to its data, the seven worst wildfires, all in California, each cost billions of dollars in insurance losses. Camp Fire, 2018: Total costs from the most expensive US fire of all time are estimated at $ 10 billion, about $ 10.38 billion by 2020 value.

Where can you live without a wildfire?

Best Places to Live and Avoid Fire at NorCal

  • Ukia is endowed with environmental and environmental benefits and a temperate climate, oak forests and fertile land, Ukia provides sustainable livelihoods. …
  • Visalia …
  • Petaluma. …
  • Fresno. …
  • Stockton. …
  • Eureka.

Where can I get away from wildfires? As wildfires worsen and rising sea levels rise, a small but growing number of Americans choose to relocate to places such as New England or the Appalachian Mountains that are considered safe havens since the revolution of weather.

Where in CA is safe from wildfires?

Across California, about 350,000 people live in fireplaces with no more exit routes than Paradise, according to a 2019 survey. Areas with limited exit routes include: Highland Park, Eagle Rock, Pacific Palisades and Rancho Palos Verdes in Los Angeles County.

What part of California is most affected by wildfires?

StatusDistrictThe risk is 0.03%
1Riverside684,400
2Los Angeles514,500
3San Bernardino471,700
4San Diego277,400

Where should we be safe from wildfires?

Find an outdoor water source with a hose that can reach any part of your property. Make a fireplace with no leaves, garbage or burning equipment at least 30 feet from your home. Choose an air-conditioned room. Close all doors and windows.

Can you survive a wildfire in a river?

If possible, run to a building or a car. If you are near water, such as a river or a pond, seek protection from the water or use it to keep some space between you and the fire. The fire will not burn across the water, unless it is a narrow stream with many hanging trees.

Can a wildfire cross a river?

a fire burning near the street. If the fire had time to burn — and produce energy ”—for acres and acres before reaching the road, spotting spots may cause fires to cross roads, rivers, streams, and even lakes.

What happens to rivers during forest fires?

The water after the forest fire is also often highly polluted, carrying mud, debris and heavy sediment loads. So while the amount of water available may increase after a major fire, there is a possibility that the water quality will worsen, he said.

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