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It’s been quite a transformative season at Netflix, but I didn’t quite understand how much the business had changed until I started playing with some hidden numbers amid the latest round of layoffs. from Netflix.

Those layoffs, according to an internal memo obtained by The Hollywood Reporter, totaled 316 people, which the company said represented 3% of its workforce. Simple math (although it’s true that the math is never easy for journalists) indicates that 3% means there were 316 layoffs out of approximately 10,000 employees.

Also read: Netflix cuts another 316 workers

It’s not a huge slice of a multi-billion dollar business, but it’s… not great, especially for the hundreds of lives disrupted by the sudden end of dozens of well-paying and previously needed positions.

More generally, this means that Netlfix, by its own accounts, has something like 9,700 workers. Just six months ago, in late 2021, Netflix filings showed the company had 11,300 employees.

So where did the other 1,600 jobs go? The difference between 11,300 and 9,700 is considerable, a drop of more than 14% in less than six months, or about one in seven employees.

Netflix has a notoriously rigorous culture that pays employees extremely well, but promptly kicks them out with a nice severance package if they somehow fall short.

But even with the turnover that can be attributed to this human resources policy, we can precisely trace back to only 641 redundancies reported since March. The other 1,000 jobs that disappeared were approved positions that the company did not fill when someone left.

The cuts come at a time when the company is already doing a lot and plans to do more, as it spends $17 billion this year on content.

It already operates 40 production centers around the world that find, produce and deliver local content to over 220 million subscribers in more than 190 countries. And the company is building an ad-supported tier (a whole new business), and can dive into live-streamed events (a new business) and deeper into longer theatrical releases with much larger marketing budgets ( a very old business to be done very differently). It also launched a video game division last year that acquires development studios and titles.

You can see where some of the money spent by the company is going. I was in one of Netflix’s elegant Hollywood office towers last week, for a preview screening of The Gray Man. The Russo Brothers spy thriller, which created four of the greatest Marvel Avengers films for Disney, marks Netflix’s most expensive swing ever to create a new franchise.

I won’t break the embargo with details on The Gray Man, which has a limited theatrical release in two weeks and debuts on Netflix a week after that, on July 15. But let’s just say you can see seemingly every penny of the $200 million they spent on screen, as an all-star cast travels locations across multiple continents amidst the roaring mayhem of the tallest ship.

It’s not the only highlight of the summer release schedule, either.

One of Netflix’s enduring hits, The Umbrella Academy, returned last week, and the second half of season four of another of Netflix’s biggest hits, Stranger Things, debuts Friday. The company puts a lot of great stuff on screen. But it turns out that in the future they will do it with a lot less people.

In fact, Netflix’s workforce is now only slightly larger than it was at the end of 2020, when the early months of the pandemic complicated hiring, recruiting and retention. The number of employees grew at its lowest rate in five years, albeit by a still notable rate of 9.3%, to reach 9,400 workers.

Now, the company has quietly gone through an almost complete reset of its operations, even as it embarks on a series of new initiatives while continuing to spend all that money on new shows.

Company executives have been actively reassuring glum agents, production companies and stars that they intend to keep spending on all sorts of projects. And they want to create more big event projects, like The Gray Man, Stranger Things and The Umbrella Academy.

But here are the key questions of Netflix’s Great Reset: What’s not getting done, of all the initiatives new and old, when you’re getting rid of about one in seven employees? And will customers notice? It should be a fun summer.

David Bloom of Words & Deeds Media is a Santa Monica, CA-based writer, podcaster, and consultant focused on the transformative collision of technology, media, and entertainment. Bloom is a senior contributor to numerous publications and producer/host of the Bloom in Tech podcast. He taught digital media at the USC School of Cinematic Arts and regularly lectures at many other universities. Bloom has previously worked for Variety, Deadline (opens in a new tab), Red Herring, and the Los Angeles Daily News, among other publications; was vice president of corporate communications at MGM; and served as associate dean and director of communications at the USC Marshall School of Business. Bloom graduated with honors from the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

David Bloom of Words & Deeds Media is a Santa Monica, CA-based writer, podcaster, and consultant focused on the transformative collision of technology, media, and entertainment. Bloom is a senior contributor to numerous publications and producer/host of the Bloom in Tech podcast. He taught digital media at the USC School of Cinematic Arts and regularly lectures at many other universities. Bloom has previously worked for Variety, Deadline (opens in a new tab), Red Herring, and the Los Angeles Daily News, among other publications; was vice president of corporate communications at MGM; and served as associate dean and director of communications at the USC Marshall School of Business. Bloom graduated with honors from the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

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  • Participate in a team building game because it is fun and enjoyable rather than looking for a reward.
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In intrinsically motivated behaviors, the reward is the activity itself. The most recognized theory of intrinsic motivation was first based on people’s needs and motivations. On the same subject : The fire causes damage worth $ 100K at the Western Hills Sports Mall. Hunger, thirst and sex are biological needs that we are driven to pursue in order to live and be healthy.

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